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Bolachas Now Playing

#236: Kate NV, “Room for the Moon”

Kate NV’s third record, Room for the Moon, is our album of the week. The Moscow-based musician takes us on a trip through 70s and 80s Russian and Japanese pop music and film with 47min of synth- and bass-heavy melodies. Plus: new tracks by John PrineNorah JonesLeah SeniorMargo PriceLori McKennaNick LoweBedouineLowland HumDrab CityThe Cactus BlossomsSondre LercheLos RetrosJarvis CockerRon GalloLeon BridgesChancha Via CircuitoMulatu Astatke, Sonic Boom, Dougie PooleBuilt to SpillBlitzen TrapperNaked GiantsIdlesSammy BruePert Near SandstoneMatt Costa, and Lionlimb.

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Bolachas Now Playing

#229: Lucinda Williams, “Good Souls Better Angels”

Fourteen LPs into her career, Lucinda Williams is roots music’s biggest treasure. Not sure how she hasn’t crossed over enough into an ocean of indie reverence. Their loss. “Good Souls Better Angels” is yet another gem from the Louisiana singer-songwriter. Plus: new tracks by Angelo De AugustineJohn Paul WhiteLizanne KnottHazel EnglishKatie Von SchleicherJennie LawlessJenny O.Jaime WyattWhitney RoseIsrael NashThe Texas GentlemenGarrett T. Capps, Lithics, No AgeBuilt to SpillSammy BrueOkey Dokey, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, John K. Samson, Chuck Prophet OfficialZachary CaleModern Nature, Blake Mills, Sam Prekop, and Khruangbin.

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Bolachas Now Playing

#218: Frazey Ford, “U Kin B the Sun”

It’s been too long since we’ve heard from Frazey Ford – our playlist wasn’t even around when she released “Indian Ocean” back in 2014. Fortunately, the wait is over, and we’re delighted to have our favorite soulful Americana singer-songwriter back. This week, we bring you a couple of songs off “U Kin B The Sun” plus new tracks from John MorelandLilly HiattWhitney RoseLady LambHeather Woods BroderickSharon Van EttenBrandy ClarkNicole Atkins, Jason Isbell, Brent CobbChristopher Paul StellingDesureJames SteinleNathaniel RateliffBuilt to SpillSufjan Stevens & Lowell Brams, Toby HayAlex RexCalifoneShoppingRolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, and Amanda Shires.

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live

NOS Primavera Sound 2019

  • Hugo Lima / NOS Primavera Sound

It’s starting to be too common: no matter how warm and sunny it is in the week leading up to the festival, NOS Primavera Sound (NPS) is doomed to be ruined by at least one day of rain. The first day did not look promising after the announcement of the passage of depression Miguel (no, not the rnb star who performed there a couple of years ago) through the north of Portugal. Flights were cancelled, Ama Lou and Peggy Gou could not reach Porto in time to perform, strong winds and rain showers threatened to turn Parque da Cidade into a muddy mess, the gates were opened almost an hour later than it was scheduled.

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live

NOS Primavera Sound 2019: printable timetables, our preview and playlist

It doesn’t matter how conservative or liberal you are: people are naturally resistant to change, especially if the previous form of what’s changing was so dear to them. We get it: “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”. Judging by the tone and content of most comments we can find online about this year’s Primavera lineup, both in Porto and Barcelona, folks ain’t happy about “the new normal”. Yes, some of the biggest pop artists in the planet have claimed most of the spots with the big font in it. Yes, there’s a shortage of loud, extreme music we often found at the long gone ATP stage, and every year there are less and less historical, cult indie rock bands reforming for a Primavera performance. But, other than that – tiny specks on a lineup of over 120 bands in Barcelona and over 60 in Porto – has it really changed that much? Is the Primavera DNA gone? (Was there really a “Primavera DNA” to begin with?)